South Polar Times book

A Folio Society limited edition

South Polar Times

Created by the crew of Captain Scott's epic antarctic expeditions, a unique publication offering a fascinating and moving glimpse of life for explorers at the furthest reaches of the world.

Published price: US$ 945.00

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South Polar Times

The South Polar Times was a magazine created by members of Captain Scott’s expeditions to entertain themselves during the four months of Antarctic winter. A unique publication, it offers a fascinating and moving glimpse of life for explorers at the furthest reaches of the world. This, the first complete facsimile of all 12 original volumes, has been created by The Folio Society in partnership with the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG), the British Library and the Scott Polar Research Institute.

Production Details

South Polar Times book

Limited to 1,000 sets.

12 issues, reproduced in facsimile for the first time as individual volumes. The pages are sewn and bound in card using the ‘ota’ binding technique.

Printed in full colour to match the original typewriter-ribbon colours.

With numerous watercolour paintings, caricatures, silhouettes, photographs and maps.

The handmade nature of the original has been carefully followed, including a tipped-in fold-out map and tracing paper to protect the photographic prints.

Presentation box is covered with cloth and fastened with a magnetic clasp.

Accompanied by a comprehensive commentary volume.

The collection is 1224 pages in total, whilst the commentary is 232 pages.

Collection size: 10¾" X 8⅛"

Commentary size: 11" X 8¼"

South Polar Times


Your opportunity to own a piece of Polar history. A Folio Society facsimile edition, limited to 1,000 numbered copies. The first complete facsimile has been created by The Folio Society in partnership with the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG), the British Library and the Scott Polar Research Institute

South Polar Times April 2012 At the start of the 20th century most of the far places of the world had been explored. Only the Polar regions, bound in ice and well-nigh impenetrable, remained to be conquered. Captain Scott led two expeditions to the Antarctic, on the ship Discovery in 1902 and the Terra Nova in 1911. He and his men waited out the long months of winter darkness, carrying out scientific research, and then used the brief summers to explore the uncharted continent, culminating in 1911 with their ill-fated journey to the South Pole, forever etched on the national consciousness.

The South Polar Times was a magazine created by members of Captain Scott’s expeditions to entertain themselves during the four months of Antarctic winter. Typed up, and illustrated with paintings, sketches and photographs, each issue was read aloud to all hands. They contain a mixture of the ‘grave and gay’, serious reports on the weather or fauna interspersed with cartoons, songs and articles that gently poke fun at members of the expedition. Together the material gives us an unsurpassed sense of their community: legendary personalities such as Scott, Shackleton, Wilson and Cherry-Garrard, as well as scientists and ordinary seamen, all of whom had been inspired to travel to the furthest reaches of the earth and risk their lives.

Only one copy has been produced and this has been made as complete and perfect as possible under our circumstances, in the hope that the whole thing may be thoroughly well reproduced with all the illustrations when we get home
SCOTT’S JOURNAL

South Polar Times April 2012Scott’s intention has been fully realised in this painstaking and exact reproduction of all 12 issues of the South Polar Times. The original manuscripts, typed by the various editors, illustrated with drawings, watercolours and with photographs printed by Herbert Ponting in his Antarctic darkroom, have a thrilling immediacy. Opening the facsimile is to feel oneself in direct contact with the group of men who began the first great scientific exploration of Antarctica. It conveys an unsurpassed sense of the camaraderie that supported them, the patriotic vision that inspired them and the stoicism and courage that enabled them to endure and make light of terrible privations.

The history of exploration in Antarctica continues to fascinate us, but the dramatic ‘race to the Pole’ and tragic death of Scott and his companions has overshadowed much of what the expeditions were really about: scientific study, the pursuit of knowledge for its own sake, and a desire to test oneself against the most extreme conditions on earth. The South Polar Times offers an insight into the daily conditions, tasks and amusements of the expedition that is more evocative than any history book or biography. We can see Scott’s meticulous plans and calculations, the work of adapting the sledges, sewing reindeer skins for sleeping bags, practising skiing, exercising the animals and worrying over rations – activities which give the lie to some ill-informed criticisms of Scott as an ‘amateur’ who did not prepare properly or who scorned Inuit knowledge of survival in Polar conditions.

An evocative, moving record of the heroic age of exploration

Perhaps even more valuable than this window into the past is the light it sheds on the outlook of the expedition members which – 100 years and two world wars later – is at once familiar and strange. Edwardian society was still rigidly class-bound, while rank was naturally paramount in the Royal Navy. Although the expedition members functioned as a close and devoted team, and all contributed to the South Polar Times, we are reminded of how deep social divisions remained. Wilson drew sledge flags and heraldic devices for the officers and scientists, not for the petty officers or other ranks. Patriotism is a dominant note in many of the poems, which speak of ‘England’s pride’ or ‘Britons to a man’, despite the fact that many of the crew were from Australia, New Zealand and even Norway. Trivial details, however, prove revealing of how much the group did share culturally: popular music-hall songs rewritten with new lyrics that the men sang together; a pastiche of Walt Whitman’s poetry; and an account of their own expedition as recently decoded papyrus leaves – a spoof on the great Rosetta Stone controversy.

The South Polar Times is a powerful piece of history that shows us a heroic age in incomparable detail. The editions are beautiful and interesting in their own right: Scott, Shackleton and Bowers were all extremely talented writers, while Wilson was an excellent artist, and many others tried their hand at silhouettes, sketches and cartoons, including Lieutenant Barnes and Leading Stoker Arthur Quartley. Our modern fascination with the magnificent, lonely beauty of Antarctica is the legacy of the words and images left to us by these pioneers.

'Working with The Folio Society to bring this unique project to fruition has been a pleasure – they have proved themselves the most dedicated and expert of partners’
ALASDAIR MACLEOD, Royal Geographical Society (with IBG)

Reviews


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Review by mcwhitehead on 26th Mar 2013

Text: Illustrations: Binding: Rating: 5/5

"As an avid reader of exploration adventures, especially the polar regions, once I received the example pack I immeditately ordered this special edition. I love this set along with it's companion volu..." [read more]

Review by turracoo on 1st Dec 2012

Text: Illustrations: Binding: Rating: 5/5

"What a privilege it is to own this collection. I have always been fascinated by polar exploration and when the chance came up through the society to own this limited edition, I did not think twice. It..." [read more]

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